Teaching

I work as a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at City, University of London, where I am Programme Director for the MA/MFA in Creative Writing, which has offers in Fiction, Genre Fiction and Creative Non-Fiction.

This suite of degrees relaunches in September 2021, replacing the previous, highly successful two-year MA degree, and applications are now open.

The one-year MA is designed to help you develop your creative writing skills in a specific genre of your choice through workshops, seminars and intensive study of model texts, with elective modules taken from an exciting range from City’s English and Publishing MAs. The degree ends with a Creative Writing Dissertation of 15,000 words.

The two-year MFA covers the same programme as the MA in the first year, but then adds a second year in which you will receive excellent regular supervision from a published writer in your genre or form as you work towards completing a book-length manuscript, with a taught module in the pedagogy of Creative Writing.

Prior to starting at City, I spent four years at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, where I ran the undergraduate and postgraduate Creative Writing programmes.

Some of my posts on Creative Writing teaching

EMAIL
jonathan.gibbs@city,ac.uk

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Notes on creative writing: How long should a chapter be?

The second in an occasional series of posts reflecting on bits and pieces I’ve learned teaching Creative Writing both previously at UEA and St Mary’s University, Twickenham, and now, at City, University of London, where I run the MA/MFA Creative Writing, which is now recruiting for September 2021 entry. How long should a chapter be? This […]

Notes on creative writing: using cinema as a model for writing prose fiction even though I’m not that big a fan of cinema

The two ways that I think of film as a useful guide to writing prose scenes is firstly in terms of dialogue, and then in terms of pacing. Some creative writing students dislike dialogue, and can write whole scenes with none of it at all. For others it’s the best way into drafting. You imagine your characters talking to each other, and that helps you drive towards your planned plot development. It’s easier, in a way, to make a character say something than do something. There’s less at stake.